Many of the proposed strategies use the notions introduced by Claude Shannon to solve problems of communication… Wordle is a game of chance William Casselman University of British Columbia The game Wordle, which is found currently on the New York Times official Wordle site, can be played by anybody withRead More →

An epidemic is a sequence of random events If a contact is made, then whether or not infection is transferred is much like tossing a (loaded) coin. How can a simulation take all this uncertainty into account? Bill Casselman University of British Columbia Just recently, I started thinking about makingRead More →

Am I really uninfected? COVID-19 and rapid testing What’s new is the appearance of a large number of rapid tests, for both professional and home use. They are relatively inexpensive, more convenient to administer, and capable of returning results quickly… Bill Casselman University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada I discussedRead More →

Sensitivity, Specificity, and COVID-19 Testing As every doctor should know, medical tests are rarely 100% accurate. Interpreting them is a matter of probability. And probability, of course, is a matter of mathematics… Bill Casselman University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Well, make up your mind. Does he have it orRead More →

Mathematics and the Family Tree of SARS-Cov-2 It’s a remarkable process and, if it weren’t so dangerous to humanity, would be deserving of admiration. … Bill Casselman University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Introduction There are two major ways in which mathematics has contributed to our understanding of the diseaseRead More →

Bill Casselman’s Column Archive Here are Bill Casselman’s older Feature Columns. Bill’s newest columns may be found here. January 2021 – Am I really uninfected? COVID-19 and rapid testing (Math and the Sciences, Math and Nature, Probability and Statistics) September 2020 – Does He Have It?: Sensitivity, Specificity, and COVID-19Read More →